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Showing posts from 2017

Acknowledging all we have, and all whom we are supposed to admire, don't actually have, in "Blade Runner 2049"

Ryan Gosling is a replicant who is probably the most important police officer working for the order-that-be's police force. His job is to take out, to chase down and kill, the previous models of replicants, who are awry in the world in that they have been programmed with too much free will. As he goes about his business, probably for the fact that he could rip their arms off if he ever wanted to, people feel free to sneer at him for his non-human status but they don't dare touch him, so he more or less goes about the world as if he's got effective people repellent on him. That's on the streets. In the air, he's king, as he glides his vehicle through ample, uncrowded, city-scapes, like a drone providing us with Apple TV city vistas. And in the office, he reports direct to the police chief, who doesn't quite see him as human, doesn't see him as her level, but who clearly respects and likes him; takes more than a casual interest in him. And he never has to pre…

Conversation around Richard Brody's argument that Aronofsky is quite wrong concerning what his movie is about, at the New Yorker Movie Facebook Club

Richard Brody shared a link.Moderator · September 21 at 12:18am Mother! has inspired a surprisingly divergent range of responses regarding the simplest questions of all—what it's about—and the most surprising of those responses are from Darren Aronofsky and Jennifer Lawrence themselves. I tried earlier today to get at why the interpretive variety strikes me as odd, why the director's and star's views strike me as odder, and where, in general, filmmakers' ideas about the meaning of their work fits into the movie-viewing experience: https://www.newyorker.com/…/darren-aronofsky-says-mother-is…