The porn you once watched


I asked Mayer if he believed there was reason to worry that one’s porn-browsing history could be sold — say, to a potential employer — or made public. “I’m not aware of any company intentionally doing either,” he said. “But it’s just one rogue employee or data breach away.” The recent revelation that the NSA spied on Muslim “radicals’” porn-viewing habits with the plan of using that information to discredit them makes the threat seem all that more real. “The NSA gets most of its data from private companies. They’re the start of the surveillance supply chain,” said Downey. “It might start with quote-unquote radicals, but it could go to any one of us.”
So should you worry about your porn being tracked? Yes. There is plenty of reason for concern. But remember that ad trackers aren’t just on porn sites — they’re on social networks, financial websites, medical forums, you name it. In fact, an Abine study found that porn sites had fewer trackers than almost any other category of site. As one privacy analyst put it to me, focusing on porn tracking minimizes the problem. What you watch on YouJizz is the very least of it. (“Who’s tracking your porn?,” Tracy Clark-Flory, Salon.com)
- - - - -
KPinSEA


"The piece went on to report that the details of one’s visit to a porn site “could be incorporated into the vast dossiers that internet, advertising and data companies create about individuals, and are used to tailor the ads and content people see.”"
What undiscovered tribe in the Amazon didn't know this already?

It still matters when we decide to float this up as a matter of public consideration. We all know that visits to porn sites could be used to down an awful lot of people. Dave Eggers' "The Circle" had as part of its plot the mass downing of disfavored politicians by a reveal of this sort of tracking data. It could be that we're focusing on this possibility — the easy ruin of almost anyone in America, instantly—as preamble, as a laying out, for the next incarnation and character of Occupy. 
Eggers' version, though, was of most people favoring the reveal, as they were all members of the same unity — the Circle — not those fearing being spied out by investigators. If we all somehow develop into such a unity and all our past "sins" are excused by being part of a time when we were different people — still yet unclean — with a different relation to the state, we might actually approve all the tracking, and want more of it to target those who must hate, hate, hate the nation so much to find so much wrong with it. 

Comments

Popular Posts